Night Photography

A while back, I wrote a post about starting an open-source project. The focus of that article was on starting an open-source project as an individual. I received a lot of positive feedback and also some questions. nless you’ve been on Mars for the last few months, you’ve already heard the news that Adobe is feature-freezing Fireworks. And Adobe is not offering a replacement tool for Fireworks users (at least, not for now.) What does this mean for you if you use (and rely on) Fireworks to design user interfaces and screens? What are your options?

Getting Started

Suppose someone at your company wants to open-source something. This has never happened before and you’re not sure what to do. Do you just put it up on GitHub? Announce it in a press release or blog post? How do you know that the code is OK to open-source? There is a lot of planning to do, and it all starts (unfortunately) with the legal department.

Giving away company assets is as much a legal issue as anything else. The very first conversation should be with an appropriate member of your company’s legal team to discuss the ins and outs of open-sourcing. In larger companies, one or more intellectual property (IP) attorneys are likely on staff or on retainer; in smaller companies, this conversation might start with the general counsel. In either case, it’s important to lay out exactly what you want to do and to clarify that you’d like to formalize a repeatable process for open-sourcing projects.

The primary legal concerns tend to be around licensing, code ownership and trade secrets. These are all important to discuss openly. Because many companies have done this already, you should have a fair amount of evidence of how other companies have established their processes. The most important thing is to engage the legal department early in the process and to have a champion on the legal team who you can work with should any issues arise.

Choose A Default License

One of the first topics of discussion should be which open-source license the company will use as its standard. Leaving the team for each project to decide for itself which license to use is a bad idea, because a lack of awareness could quite possibly lead to two projects from the same company having incompatible licenses. Decide up front exactly which license to use, and use it for all open-source projects in your company.

I touched on the different types of licenses in my previous article. In general, companies tend to standardize either the three-clause BSD license or the Apache license. Very rarely will a company standardize the MIT license, because the standard MIT license doesn’t contain a clause that prevents use of the company’s name in advertisements for software that makes use of the project. The Apache license has additional clauses related to patent protection, which some companies prefer.

The ultimate choice of a license typically comes down to legal considerations on the nature of the code being released. The philosophical implications of which license you choose are not important; using the same license for all projects in your company is important.

Save